But My Church is Different!!

church of the holy mackerel

If there is one kind of email I can count on almost every week, it is an email from a Christian determined to explain to me that their version/flavor of Christianity is different from the Christianity I write about on The Way Forward. They go to great lengths to convince me they or their denomination/church/pastor is real they deal, true blue, just like Jesus Christianity. They are certain that if I would just take a look at their brand of Christianity, that I would see that the Christianity I was a part of in the past was a corrupt, broken, or bastardized version of Christianity.  They hope by exposing me to brand 10,200 of the faith once delivered to the saints, that I will see that their version of Jesus is THE way, truth, and life.  They think if I will just catch a glimpse of their Jesus, if I would taste and see that he is good, that my blinders would fall off and I would be gloriously and wonderfully saved. (and, of course, become a member of their brand of Christianity)

I have found it quite easy to disabuse these people of their notions by asking a few questions:

  • Do you believe the Bible is a supernatural book, a divine book, an inspired book, or the Word of God?
  • Do you believe there is one, true, living God?
  • Do you believe Jesus was divine, the son of God, worked miracles, died on the cross, rose again from the dead, and ascended back to heaven?
  • Do you believe in sin and redemption?
  • Do you believe a person must be saved from their sins in order to go to heaven?
  • Do you believe that a person who is not saved from the sins will go to hell when they die. (or be annihilated)

Of course, the email writers will answer all six questions in the affirmative. YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! pause for a moment, avert eyes, screw up face to show pain, y-e-s. The reality of hell, where the worm dieth not and the fire is not quenched, and God sending people to this burning Lake of Fire,  troubles most Christians, save the Calvinist, Fundamentalist Baptist, or Evangelical.

If they answered these six questions with a YES, I point out to them that they are not, in the main, any different from any other Christian. They can change the name of the door to True Faith Church, Living Word Church, or the Remnant Church, but they are no different that First Baptist or St Peter’s up the street from them.

While there are certainly differences between individual Christians, things like temperament and what they emphasize, at the end of the proverbial day, it is One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism. After 50 years in the Christian church, 25 years as an Evangelical pastor, and visiting well over a hundred churches, I doubt there is a Christianity out there that I don’t know about.

I need to be clear, I have weighed ALL Christianities in the balance and found them wanting. I have concluded that the Christian God does not exist and he/she/it is the creation of humans Lest someone think there is a small glimmer of hope for me, let me answer the six questions I listed above:

  • I do not think the Bible is a supernatural book. I do not think it is the Word of God. I do not think it gives us everything that pertains to life and godliness. I do not think it words or message are in any way inspired.  The Bible is just a book, like any other book I can buy at Amazon.com. While it may contain moral and ethical teachings I agree with, I do not consult it when determining how to live my life. Outside of consulting it for a blog post, I have not read the Bible in six years.
  • I do not think the Christian God exists, either bodily or spiritually.
  • I do not think Jesus was divine or a miracle worker. He was a man who lived 2,000 years ago. He lived, died, was buried, end of story.
  • I do not accept the teaching’s of the Bible and Christianity on sin and redemption. (see the previous three answers)
  • I do not think there is an afterlife or a heaven.
  • I do not think there is an afterlife or a hell.

This is Bruce Gerencser’s faith once delivered to those who can read.

Notes

Extra credit bonus points if you can find all the Bible verse references in this post.

And yes, I am quite familiar with ANY form/version/flavor of Christianity you are going to mention in your comment. If you feel the urge, you know like you have a Christian weak bladder, it is evident you TOTALLY missed the gist of this post.

That said, I do enjoy talking about religion, Christianity, and the Bible. After all, it is what I know best. But remember, this is an intellectual exercise for me. There is zero chance of me becoming a Christian again. Even if Jesus personally appeared to me, I would assume that I had overdosed on narcotics.  I write because I have a story to tell and I hope to be a help to those who are considering leaving Christianity or have already left. So many sinners that are dead in trespass and sin, behold He Cometh, why waste your time on a person who has done despite to the spirit of grace and trampled under the blood of the covenant? I am an apostate, a man  God has given over to a reprobate mind. I am a man who has tasted the good word of God and the powers of the world to come, and fallen away. It is impossible to renew me again unto repentance. Thus saith the Lord.

Comments (38)

  1. richardmarlowe236

    “faith once delivered to the saints,” Jude

    “Jesus is THE way, truth, and life.” John 14:6

    “taste and see that he is good” Psalms

    “hell, where the worm dieth not and the fire is not quenched” Matthew

    “Lake of Fire” Revelation

    “One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism.” Ephesians

    “I have weighed ALL Christianities in the balance and found them wanting.” Daniel

    “everything that pertains to life and godliness.” Peter

    “faith once delivered” Jude

    “dead in trespass and sin” Ephesians 2

    “behold He Cometh”??

    “despite to the spirit of grace and trampled under the blood of the covenant” Hebrews

    “God has given over to a reprobate mind.” Romans 1

    “tasted the good word of God and the powers of the world to come, and fallen away. It is impossible to renew me again unto repentance.” Hebrews 6

    The references may not be right. I was doing it from memory.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      Good job, my son, great shalt thou be among men. Go and sin no more. :)

      Reply
      1. richardmarlowe236

        Awwww man! But sinning is so much fun!

        Reply
  2. brbr2424

    “The Bible is just a book, like any other book I can buy at Amazon.com.” So true, that can’t be overstated. The amount of good reading material available today is almost unfathomable. There were not many book titles available in my youth (the 1970s). but in my parent’s generation (1940′s) there were even fewer. For kids books, I think my parents just had Winnie the Pooh and Grim’s Fairy Tales. Go back one generation further to my grandparents and the only reading material was the bible. It was the only book in the house. It’s a shame that the Bible got such a toe hold by being the only game in town. If people are looking for answers or just a good read, Amazon.com is the place to go.

    Reply
  3. Mike

    Actually, I think a Christianity that believes in anihilationism is slightly better than your average evangelical “bible-believing” Christianity that teaches eternal torment in hell. Don’t get me wrong. I have no interest in practicing any form of Christianity. But among the various Christianities, I think a Christianity that teaches anihilationism is slightly more humane than its counterparts.

    Bruce, from my reading of the Bible, both as a believer, and now an unbeliever, I’ve come to the conclusion that the Bible teaches contradictory views on the afterlife (As you know, the Bible has contradictory views on several issues). Contrary to the claims of most evangelicals, I don’t think the Bible consistently teaches eternal torment in hell for the unbeliever. I think the anihilationists have plenty of ammo to use as Biblical proof-texts as well. :-)

    This is just one more proof that the Bible is not the inerrant and perfect word of God and is just one of many issues on which the Bible contradicts itself.

    Reply
  4. NeverAgainV

    You made my night with this one: “They hope by exposing me to brand 10,200 of the faith once delivered to the saints….”

    Oh I LOVE it! After all, bible god is not the god of confusion….yet, the bible is such a confusing book and Christians have been arguing over what it says for a very long time.
    So many sects because they can’t even agree on what it means…but somewhere there is the “faith once delivered” and “unity in the faith”.

    Reply
  5. Erin

    So true. I have had this conversation many times, as well.

    I do think a Unitarian Universalist church might fit your bill (meaning not meeting your 6 points in the first list), but then, is that even church? It’s certainly not Christianity anymore. I shocked myself and went to a Christmas eve candlelight service at a UU church this year…my brother (atheist) is a (paid) employee of their choir and asked us to come. It was actually pretty nice, aside from the “round yon virgin, holy child” parts. :) I have to admit, it’s the only church I’ve ever been in where people trip over themselves to be friendly…authentically. I’ve never experienced anything other than sugar-candy-friendly as a visitor in a new church.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      If there were a UU church near here we would probably go from time to time. But, the closest one is an hour away, requiring me to get up way too early. (Besides the fact the churches are so far way, thus ruining the one reason I would want to go, fellowship)

      So, my Church meets on Sunday 20 or so weeks a year. It does have three services on Sunday, one on Monday, and one on Thursday, except on Thanksgiving when there is three services. That is almost a hundreds services a year at the Church of the NFL, and I don’t even have to tithe. (Though feeding the other congregants, my children and their families does cost a few bucks) :)

      Reply
      1. sgl

        so is this coming sunday’s service considered “easter” or “christmas” in your liturgy? and who are you cheering for? ;)

        Reply
        1. ... Zoe ~

          Go Seahawks!

          Reply
          1. gimpi

            GO SEAHAWKS!

          2. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

            It will be a great game. I am going with DENVER.

        2. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

          Easter. It would have been Christmas too if the Bengals had made it.

          I am rooting for Denver. I think it will be a great game. (and many Super Bowl’s are not)

          Reply
          1. Aram McLean

            Gotta love how the two states that legalized pot are getting together for a “Super Bowl”. (Yes, yes, not original, I know)

            But knowing how superstitious professional athletes are, should be a totally pot legal USA by the time next year’s Super Bowl rolls around :)

      2. ami

        Bruce, your church of the NFL does take tithes… it’s classified as a non profit under US tax code. You’re subsidizing them. :)

        Reply
        1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

          Very true, and I would love to see their non profit status revoked. I was shocked when I learned they were a non-profit.

          Reply
      3. Erin

        LOL love your church. Not a football fan myself, but find community where it works for you. :) There is a great little UU two blocks from us, but my few experiences with UU still means too much bible for my taste.

        Reply
  6. mikespeir

    This is one of the most exasperating things about the Faith. Every so often I’ll read something that’s just devastating to Christianity. But then I’ll put myself back into my old Christian mode and realize it wouldn’t have fazed me. There will be some minor distinction that would have let me off the hook: “Yeah, but disbelief isn’t what sends you to Hell. Belief is the key that opens the door to salvation!” I’d be completely avoiding the obvious fact that either way salvation or damnation turns on whether one believes. And because of that one tiny discrepancy I would be free to dismiss the whole argument.

    Reply
  7. vjack

    Excellent post! I am going to bookmark this and email it to those who keep making this claim in response to something I write. I’d say you nailed it.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      Thanks!

      Reply
  8. De Benny

    Do you believe the Bible is a supernatural book, a divine book, an inspired book, or the Word of God?

    Depends on what you mean by it. Do I think the bible is inerrant? Certainly not. People can err, things cannot err. Ever met an inerrant fridge? Or an errant shelf? But the bible has to do with God in so far, as it is a written witness to the faith to that God over the centuries. In that sense it is also inspired, because the authors were inspired by their faith. if they had not been, they’d done something else then write about Him…

    Do you believe there is one, true, living God?

    Sure.

    Do you believe Jesus was divine, the son of God, worked miracles, died on the cross, rose again from the dead, and ascended back to heaven?

    Absolutely. I guess you’d hardly find a Christian who wouldn’t answer yes to the last two questions. So even if there are Christian flavors out there you don’t know (and chances are high, because the USA are not the world), they’d all answer yes to these two.

    Do you believe in sin and redemption?

    I believe there is sin. But this is just a term I use for a certain structure in the world. You might also call it “evil” or find other terms. So this doesn’t say anything. If you asked me what I believe sin is, THEN we would be able to find out about whether or not I follow a flavor of Christianity you haven’t seen yet.

    Do you believe a person must be saved from their sins in order to go to heaven?

    I believe a person goes to heaven, when he or she believes. Does this answer your question “yes” or “no”? People can hardly be saved from their “sins”, as these are deeds already done. They are there, they cannot be undone. God is no time machine (and never intended to be as far as I believe). So there is no saving from sins. You can be saved from sin, which can mean too many things to mention them all here. Again: Asking what this would mean would more help you determine whether you know a certain brand of Christianity or not.

    Do you believe that a person who is not saved from the sins will go to hell when they die. (or be annihilated)

    As I don’t believe you can hardly be saved from sins already done… But I think I’ll interpret what you write as: Do you think non-believers will go to hell or be annihilated? I don’t know, and I cannot change it whatever will happen. This has hardly anything to do with my faith. But from what I think I know about God, I don’t think He’ll loose anybody. I am with Calvin here: Important is, that we go to heaven. What happens to others is a question one could ask, but it is relevant not for me or us, but for them. Let them mind their business.

    I need to be clear, I have weighed ALL Christianities in the balance and found them wanting.

    No you have not. Nobody can know ALL Christianities (unless he defines everything he isn’t aware of as “not really christian”, which would somehow be a poor argument).

    Lest someone think there is a small glimmer of hope for me

    There’s always hope. You might remember: For God everything is possible.

    There is zero chance of me becoming a Christian again.

    Never say never. Maybe you are closer to Christianity in your atheism now than you have been ever before.

    I am a man who has tasted the good word of God and the powers of the world to come, and fallen away.

    Are you sure?

    I will not attempt to try to talk you back over, that’d be a waste of time and honestly, I don’t believe that could even work, with any person. Because faith is given by God’s grace, not by a clever speaker. The reason why I write this comment is just to question your whole “I know it all” attitude. I am sure you know quite a bit about Christianity in the US or even the whole anglo saxon world, especially everything evangelical. But are you so well aware of the Russian Orthodox belief? What do the Copts believe, and in how far is that different from the Maronites?

    You don’t know all brands of Christianity, and you can hardly know their beliefs.

    Of course, all will believe in God. And most would have a triune image of God (Jehova’s Witnesses don’t if you consider them Christian, neither do the Mormons, if I am well informed).

    You don’t believe in God, okay. Then say it. But don’t say you know all and thus don’t believe in God any more. You’ve made your experiences, like everyone else, and they led you to that point, like everyone else. I can guess you are a bit pissed by people trying to “resave” you. And most will likely come from brand sof Christianity you know, this has to do with the language you write your post in. Most English mother tungues with internet access come from western countries, before all the USA I guess. So most commenters will repeat ever the same arguments (if you ask me, as soon as you start arguing, faith is out of the game, because there is not one argument for faith out there). That’s the problem with going public with a story: people will react, and I guess Americans react rather extreme to anything that has to do with religion. But don’t use this as an excuse to be unprecise about what you say. You know your share of Christianity, and from all points of view that are relevant to you, all those Christianities make no more sense, or are for other reasons not for you. That’s it.

    Reply
    1. Kat

      It might be a language thing, but I think you’ve missed the point of Bruce’s post. (I’m curious, too — is this the first, or one of the first, posts of his you’ve read?) There are sometimes huge differences in details between Christian sects, but his point was they all boil down to “yes” to these six questions, though I would say, from what I know of Bruce’s writing (I’ve been reading for several years), that he is also familiar with those who say “no” to the last one.

      To your specific objections, perhaps I can clear things up a little. I’ll skip those to which you answered with a simple “yes.”

      The Bible: Bruce did not say “inerrant,” he said “supernatural.” You can believe that every word, every comma, every accent mark is straight from the mind of God (inerrant). You can, alternately, believe that God spoke to the authors who wrote down his words as best as fallible humans can or that, without any particular prompting, people wrote down their experiences of Divine presence and action (inspired). Either way, there is a God (supernatural) who was involved in the process. If God is in nowise involved, what is the Bible?

      Sin and redemption: There seems to be a problem of interpretation here, maybe because of a language barrier. I understand what you mean about sin already committed, but Bruce was using terminology common to the Protestant church, by which most Americans (and probably people in many other English-speaking countries) would understand “sin” to mean “consequences of sin.” No, God does not, according to the Bible, go back in time and stop you from committing this or that sin; what redemption is is a forgiveness of a sin (evil) already committed, so that the sinner does not have to pay the penalty (death) for that sin. So the question really is, do you believe you need to be saved from the consequences of the sins you’ve committed? Do you believe the wages of sin are death, and God has to interfere to prevent you from paying those wages?

      Heaven and hell: Well, you obviously believe in heaven, so we’ll count that one as a yes. Your lack of curiosity about hell is certainly…unusual (and perhaps intellectually lazy), but I’m not sure if you even answered the question. Do you believe such a place exists? When you said “But from what I think I know about God, I don’t think He’ll loose anybody,” did you mean “lose” (which sounds like you think everyone will go to heaven) or “loose” (which would mean “let go of, let escape,” which sounds like God won’t let any sinners get away from hell)? You did say that people who believe go to heaven; does that mean people who don’t believe don’t go to heaven? And, if they don’t, what happens to them? I think this needs to be clarified before Bruce can decide if your Christianity is “different.”

      As for Coptic, Maronite, Russian Orthodox, I would be surprised if Bruce didn’t know something about them; he is a very widely-read man. If they answer “yes” to these questions (and even if “no” to the last), then yes, according to the criteria he set up in this post, he does know them.

      Reply
      1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

        Thank you for explaining.

        I certainly have a lot to learn about a lot of things. Most people consider me an expert when it comes to computers. (Windows based) Do I know everything there is to know? Of course not and that is why I still read tech websites/forums/magaines. The same goes for religion, especially Christianity. Do I know everything? Of course not, but I can’t imagine that someone, at this late date, is going to surprise me with data that I have not seen/considered before. 50 years in the Christian Church and 25 years as a pastor…it is fair to say that I might know a little bit about the Bible and Christianity.

        The Orthodox churches we attended were quite interesting. We really enjoyed the services but the incense drove my allergies crazy. One church in Fort Wayne…the service was great until the end when one of deacons went on a ten minute tirade about the evils of abortion. For a moment, I thought I was back in an IFB church. :)

        As far as de Benny and his view of hell/sin/gospel, he wrote a blog post about it http://blog.debenny.de/2014/01/22/sin-hell-and-gospel/ Pretty standard fare. :)

        Reply
        1. De Benny

          Pretty standard fare.

          Fair point. And it is true. Is there more to it than the “standard fare”? Maybe, taking into account context. But alas…

          Reply
    2. mikespeir

      “No you have not. Nobody can know ALL Christianities (unless he defines everything he isn’t aware of as “not really christian”, which would somehow be a poor argument).”

      There are commonalities, things they all share, that don’t wash. If you’ve found those commonalities wanting, it doesn’t matter if you can’t name every particular of every stripe of Christianity. If the foundation is bad, it’s not so important what the building on top of it looks like.

      Reply
      1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

        Thank you for “getting it!” :)

        Reply
    3. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      “All Christianities” is hyperbole. It would be impossible for me to try ALL, as in every Christianity. That said, I suspect I have been to more different sects than most anyone:

      Baptist (Independent, Southern, American, Conservative, Sovereign Grace, Free Will, Primitive, GARBC, Missionary)
      Lutheran (American, Missouri)
      Church of Lutheran Brethren
      Church of Christ (instrumental, non-instrumental)
      Disciples of Christ
      Methodist
      Free Methodist
      Christian Union
      Church of Christ in Christian Union
      United Brethren
      Roman Catholic
      Apostolic
      Vineyard
      Calvary Chapel
      Bible Church
      Pilgrim Holiness
      Orthodox
      Episcopalian
      Church of God
      Church of God Anderson
      Pentecostal
      Charismatic
      Assembly of God
      Mennonite
      Old Order Mennonite
      Presbyterian Church USA
      Orthodox Presbyterian Church
      Christian Reformed
      Protestant Reformed
      United Church of Christ
      Friends
      And a plethora of independent, unaffiliated churches

      So, no Mormon, JW, or Seventh Day Adventist, but I know what they believe.

      Taking hyperbole into account, I can say I have tried ALL Christianties. Any sect that is left would be just another flavor of the sects I have listed here.

      When it comes to Christianity, there is nothing more for me to learn, but by all means friend, teach me something I don’t know. Granted I have not tried all the non-Christian religions that humans have created, but I am well enough read to know that I am not interested.

      So, I meant what I said. :)

      It is a common dodge by Christians to play the “you haven’t been to every sect/church, so you can’t make a judgement about all of Christianity.” And then they say, they are, or their sect/church/pastor is different. I reject this kind of thinking. I live in rural NW Ohio. I have been to a majority of the communities in rural NW Ohio. There are some I have not been to, but I have been to enough that I can come to a reasonable conclusion about rural NW Ohio. None of us possess absolute knowledge, but we can gain enough knowledge to make reasoned and informed judgments. That is what I have done with Christianity. When I say there is absolutely no chance I would ever return to any form of Christianity, I mean just that. If people want to ignore what I say, and that is what you are doing, then there is nothing I can do about that. For me, the God question has been settled. Until a new God suddenly appears and makes itself known, I have no desire, interest, or need to seek after or think about God.

      And yes, I know I once was a Christian. Simple fact.

      Bruce

      Reply
      1. De Benny

        but by all means friend, teach me something I don’t know

        Maybe this is the problem. I have nothing to teach. Plus, I’d have to know what you’ve already been taught in order to knew what would be new.

        Christianity, at least for me (and I thinlk there are others as well) isn’t just some teachings I follow.

        but I am well enough read to know that I am not interested

        That’s absolutely okay with me. As I said, my point of criticism was another.

        It is a common dodge by Christians to play the “you haven’t been to every sect/church, so you can’t make a judgement about all of Christianity.”

        Maybe where you live. But you see, I am not US American, I live in a different country, a different culture. So no, this isn’t a “common dodge” here, because actually here people leaving church would say they didn’t believe and that’s it. But nobody would claim to have tried all, maybe because we don’t have so many denominations here. Either you are Protestant (which includes Calvinists and Lutherans and everything in between) or Catholic. The other denominations are such minorities that they are hardly recognized by the general public.
        Again: I don’t want to talk you into church. If you don’t believe, there’s no point in doing so. And if you believed, I wouldn’t have to.

        And then they say, they are, or their sect/church/pastor is different.

        No, all standard fare, you know ;)

        None of us possess absolute knowledge, but we can gain enough knowledge to make reasoned and informed judgments.

        See, this is the part I struggle understanding. Not only with you, but also with other Atheists and with fundamentalist Christians in general. Why judgment? Believing or not has nothing at all to do with judgment. You don’t decide to believe or not, do you? Either you believe, or you don’t. I do, you don’t, and there’s nothing we could do about it, whatever we might “judge”.

        If people want to ignore what I say, and that is what you are doing

        No, that’s not what I’m doing. What I am saying is that it is rather uppish to say one would know all Christianity. You say you know almost everythign in NW Ohio. What about Kentucky? Indiana? New York? California? Brazil? Vietnam?
        See, there is the teaching and there is the culture and that’s all intermingled. You certainly know a fair share of teachings, but this is not at all what I am talking about. Because you have the teaching on the one hand and they way people deal with it on the other, and this has to do with context and culture. And no, before you start that again: I don’t say this to make you feel you might have overseen some part in Christianity that would convince you. I do not believe that you decide for God/Jesus or anyone. It’s not up to you, it’s up to Him. So if you don’t believe, you’re out. Plain simple. And as far as I can tell that’s okay with both of us, so there really is no need to argue about it.

        Until a new God suddenly appears and makes itself known, I have no desire, interest, or need to seek after or think about God.

        That’s what I mean.

        And yes, I know I once was a Christian. Simple fact.

        You’ve been part of a Christian culture from what I can tell, and you made yourself fluent in Christian teachings. I hardly ever read about how it touched you existentially, but maybe I have to read more of your blog. It’s like the questions you asked above (which I did not all answer yes), they are all related to teachings you can “judge” about but have nothing to do with actual belief, with existential belonging or whatever you will like to call it.

        Reply
        1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

          Believing has everything to do with judgment. Belief is an intellectual act. At least it should be.

          I know enough to come to reasonable, thoughtful conclusions about Christianity. Again, by all means teach me? Point me to one Christian group that doesn’t fit the parameters I have mentioned in this post.

          Reply
    4. MichaelL65

      Say, you’re new here aren’t you?

      Reply
  9. pilgrimsinthisworld

    Wow.. for being someone that doesn’t need to seek after or think about God, you sure talk a lot about Him and the people that claim to follow Him in these blogs. Just saying… was that pithy enough? LOL ;)

    Reply
    1. Oberon

      For those of us that spent 30+ years in the faith and are now out of it, the therapy is in reading and writing about the experience. I read this blog because I was there; serious about the things of God and extremely sincere about rightly dividing the word of Truth. When it stopped making sense, I had a deep need to understand how I could have been so far off. It’s been seven or eight years now, and I still find Christianity fascinating because I now see it from the other side.

      Reply
      1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

        Thanks!

        Reply
    2. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      Not pithy, more passive-aggressive. (a common problem for Christians who don’t understand why I write and to whom) People like you are not my target audience. Because I have a brain, I do think about God intellectually. Even more important to me is the effect the Evangelical Christian religion has own our culture, schools, and government, so this is why I write about sects/churches/pastors. Christians are free to read this site, but my target audience is those who are considering leaving Christianity or who have already left. I see myself as a facilitator. I don’t care if a person believes in God or not. More than a few commenters still profess faith in God. My goal is to help others on their journey wherever it might lead. (though I don’t hide the fact that I think Evangelicalism is toxic and harmful mentally and emotionally) I have no interest in evangelizing for atheism.

      Reply
      1. ... Zoe ~

        Awomen!

        Reply
        1. Kat

          *high five* ^_^

          Reply
        2. Erin

          Second that high five for Zoe!

          Reply
  10. pilgrimsinthisworld

    Bruce.. I totally :get” why you write.. and I was just teasing you a little, NOT being passive aggressive. I actually enjoy reading your articles because one, I like to have my faith challenged, two, I see many of the situations you write about and they have been troubling to me especially in some extreme conservative sects. I have quite a few dear friends that have been very damaged and hurt by this “brand”, (even you say they are no different, I’d have to disagree) I actually found your blog by googling the damage caused by fundamentalist, conservative churches.

    Reply

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