Your Questions, Please

any questions

Every year or so, I ask readers to submit questions for me to answer. It’s that time again, so if you have a question you would like me to answer, please put it in the comment section. No strings attached. Ask, and I will do my best to answer. I am not a guru that has the answers to all of life’s questions, so if you are expecting to hear me expound of the great meaning and purpose of life, you will be disappointed. But, I will do the best I can…

I look forward to your questions.

Note

Comic drawn by Sean McLean

Comments (70)

  1. Casey

    Hello Bruce, haven’t commented for a while but here goes:

    1. What is your stance on gun control?

    2. I understand you are pro-choice, but do you believe there is a cut-off point (say at viability) before birth as to when abortion is acceptable?

    3. Do you still follow Christian sites/blogs/ministers on your own and not just because somebody referred to it? Because occasionally you quote or refer to sites without referencing how a commentator or correspondent initially linked you to one.

    4. I hope this isn’t a too personal question but do you actually dislike Evangelicals rather than just hate their ideas?

    5. What was your impression of Tim Conway when you knew him in Texas in the early ’90s?

    6. As a pastor did you ever attempt to convert someone who was openly and consciously an atheist/agnostic (or even deist) rather than just someone who’d never cared about religion or was indifferent to it?

    Reply
  2. Stephanie

    1. Looking back, do you ever wish you had done something else besides primarily being a pastor? What career would you choose now?

    2. Are there any conservative ideas that you really like?

    3. Is there a liberal stance on something that you strongly disagree with?

    Reply
  3. Jim

    What are you looking forward to in the next year?

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  4. Lydia

    Do your kids read this blog? If so, what do they think of it?

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  5. Zoe

    How’s Polly? :-)

    I’d like to know your top five favourite flowers.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  6. Heather

    Kind of random but I really want to know…if u could go anywhere in the world on a monthlong vacation and money was no object (within reason…not saying if u were a gazillionaire) where would you go and what would u do? The reason I think about this question a lot personally is that it’s my self test for depression. If I’m not depressed I want to go to Venice, the Swiss Alps, and the tropics. When depressed I want to go to bed. ;-) And that’s when i know I’m in trouble.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  7. Rustin

    Until recently I’ve never heard of the 10 commandments as described in Exodus 34. Where Moses breaks the first set then comes down with these new ones. These new ones in Ex 34 are actually referred to as the “10 commandments” but they are completely different than what we traditionally think. I’m curious if you’ve ever brought this up with Christians and what their reactions/responses were.
    Also I’m curious of what Christians say when asked how do you decide what Old Testament commandments to follow and which ones were only designated for those in the past?

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  8. Steve

    I have one, my dear friend: why is my brother a mean, petty, condescending, arrogant, self-righteous Christian asshole, bent on my destruction & misery?

    Thanks!!

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  9. Charles

    Thesis: Christian fundamentalism is a clear and present danger to the everyday freedoms enjoyed by most Americans.

    Question: If you were appointed to a secret blue ribbon panel charged with devising a national policy and strategy to “defang” the Christian fundamentalist beast in the United States, turn the American people as a whole against it, and render its whole national politico-religious agenda into a weeping and wailing wasteland characterized by the term “all is lost”, what would that policy and strategy look like?

    No. I am not a fundie.

    Reply
  10. Scott

    With your wisdom being far greater than mine could you please do a book review on “The Most Encouraging Book on Hell Ever”. A prominent blogger T Challies has put his oar in the water. http://www.challies.com/cruciform-press/the-most-encouraging-book-on-hell-ever Maybe you could watch and critique his reviews… (Just a suggestion)

    Reply
    1. John Arthur

      Hi Scott,

      Yes, I would like Bruce to review Ramseys book, if he so chooses. I haven’t read the book and, judging from what Challies says and the quote he gives, I am not likely to waste my money on purchasing it.

      That anyone can delight in the doctrine of hell and find this doctrine to be encouraging, I cannot fathom. Only someone who appears to have a calloused heart could delight in such a doctrine.

      Perhaps Ramsey should visit a burns unit in a hospital and ask himself, “Can anyone who is compassionate see someone suffering and not seek to relieve their suffering and distress if they have the capacity to do so?”

      It makes God out to be a monster and this doctrine has caused untold mental anguish and emotional pain to so many. It amounts to “mental and emotional rape”.

      Why does Ramsey delight in such an abusive doctrine?

      Shalom,
      John Arthur

      Reply
  11. lynn

    what percentage of preachers realize it’s all hogwash somewhere along the way?

    Reply
    1. Charles

      Ditto. I would like to know that too. I have always suspected that a lot of evangelical preachers start out with glorious aspirations and soon learn that the job is “a mess” at best–then having lost the heart for it—they just go through the motions rather mindlessly from then on.

      Reply
      1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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    2. brbr2424

      I would like to know how many rank and file Christians think it is hogwash, and who are just going along to get along. I wonder if there is a tell.

      Reply
      1. Charles

        There is a persistent rumor, supposedly started by fellow seminary students who knew him well, that Al Mohler in the Southern Baptist Convention was a died-in-the-wool Christian liberal and proud of it. When the Pressler/Patterson Revolution that turned the whole SBC fundamentalist occurred in 1979, the rumor goes on to say that Mohler (who was otherwise very smart/capable and widely recognized for it) was given an ultimatum along with a promise of power. Declare yourself conservative to all mankind, publicly agree with us conservatives, and we will see that you get great power in the SBC in the years to come. He complied and the promise has been acted upon over the years. The Question: In his heart, is Al Mohler still liberal and will he lead a liberal revolution in the SBC when Pressler and Patterson die, which ain’t far off from happening.

        Reply
      2. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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    3. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  12. Texas Born & Bred

    Enough questions about theology ….

    So when is Pete Rose getting into the baseball hall of fame?

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
      Reply
  13. carmen

    Did you enjoy your birthday?? Hope so… I’m guessing you did. .. :)

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      Birthday is the 19th. Going out for my birthday on the 24th with my boys and the 26th with Polly. Going to a ballgame, out to eat. Looking forward to it.

      Reply
      1. Daniel Wilcox

        Happy Birthday, Bruce.

        Reply
      2. carol

        Happy Birthday Bruce!

        You’ve received lots of questions!

        I read a question I liked on FB the other day…something like: If you could pick one musician/band to come to your place and personally sing/play for you, who would it be?

        (My choice was and still is John Hartford. Love his lyrics, music, and voice. RIP John.)

        Reply
        1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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      3. Scott

        Happy Birthday, a day late, Bruce!

        Enjoy the baseball and dinners!

        Scott

        Reply
  14. Daniel Wilcox

    Do you find it ironic that in some ways you are more ethical since leaving Christianity than when you were a pastor? (I mean this in the sense that based on your recent autobiographical posts, it seems you are more humble, compassionate, honest, etc. than when a devout Christian.)

    And why do you think this is?

    Thanks.

    Reply
  15. Scott

    In an atheistic pluralistic secular society (if it ever existed) where would a sense of morality come from?

    Reply
    1. Charles

      I am sure Bruce will have a unique and spot-on answer for you. You will recall that the Apostle Paul already offered an answer to that question in your Bible. Basically, and I think it is for the most part true because I am an anthropologist, all human societies figure out on their own that it is not right (or safe) to steal another man’s property. A great deal of the morality in the Bible was figured out independently tens of thousands of years ago by human groups that never heard of the Bible. Systems of morality are not unique to the Bible, but they tend to include a great deal of the same content—which is not surprising because humans tend to find themselves (at one time or another) in the same social predicaments all over the world.

      Reply
  16. Joyce

    I have two questions that relate to the Bible.

    1. Biblical scholarship: When I was growing up in my big-city Mennonite church, this was a big deal. There were always scholars proving things by finding new ancient texts that supported the Bible. But now as an adult who has studied the ancient world at university (history, philosophy, science, literature, linguistics), and read Bart Ehrman, and been involved with non-evangelical Christians (including Anglicans, United Church, and lots of Catholicism), I see that what I was taught doesn’t line up. How did ministers like you, Ehrman, and Dan Barker see this “evidence” and shed your faiths, and others see it and think it makes sense? Do most people who seriously study the beginnings of Christianity develop serious doubts? I was always taught that our form of Bible-based Christianity was the closest they could get to “original Christianity” but now that I know more, I know better. How does one seriously study that time period and walk away a Christian? What do these tenacious Christians think when they are presented with the reality of how we came to get the books of the Bible*, or the doctrine of the trinity, or a pile of other basic Christian basics that were decided 200 or 300 years after the life of Christ? (And decided by . . . Catholics!!! O the horror).

    *Yes, I know that there is a “Catholic” and a “Christian” bible, and that “Apocrypha” is a dirty word. But there are a bunch of other books that were rejected . . . for many reasons other than “not from god”–you know, real life reasons like politics, culture, traditions, etc.

    2. I grew up in the 70s and my family was tickled with the Living Bible. In the 80s it was all about the NIV. I know literary types love the KJV, but most KJV-loving fundies are not exactly the Shakespearean crowd, or conversant with literary merit (spoken as an English lit major who pulls her hair out when reading Xtian reviews of books and movies, whether classic or contemporary. How many times can I scream “you totally missed the point!”?). With the crowd that fetishizes the KJV, . . . why? Do they not realize the historical context of that version? Because if they did, why would they think the KJV was the one true Bible? It makes no sense. And as an aside that makes me laugh at them, do they know that it’s widely believed by historians the King James was a homosexual? (Really, I think this should be publicized more just to make them squirm. But I’m devilish like that).

    And back to the other editions . . . what’s wrong with any of them? I had the NIV with concordance, study guide and maps (I like maps). What’s wrong with it, from the KJV-fetishizer’s view?

    I had one more question, but it’s disappeared. If I remember it, I’ll post again. Looking forward to your future posts answering everyone’s questions. What a great idea.

    Reply
  17. 1415dr

    Can you make a post about the Book of Ecclesiastes, and how you interpreted it at different stages in your faith? I’m particularly interested in that book.

    Reply
  18. Brian

    Hi Bruce,

    You’re doing an excellent service with this website! My sister, who’s been an IFB for 30 years, hasn’t been to church since September. She’d developed gout and wasn’t able to move. No one from her church (not even the pastor) checked up on her to see how she was doing. That’s good Christian love for you … :D

    That said, I have two questions:
    1). When did you stop praying – closer to becoming an atheist, or in between last pastoring in 2003 and 2008?

    2). When you were in the church, what was your stance on music? did you preach listening to Christian music only, or the same kind of music as you mentioned in one of your posts? How did you feel about Christian rock in your IFB days?

    Thanks,
    -Brian

    Reply
  19. Edgar Stephens

    Why do evangelical Christians hate and slander Barack Obama so much?

    Reply
  20. Charles

    You know the answer to that already. It’s not rocket science.

    Reply
    1. Righteously Angry

      you didn’t ask me and bruce can take this down if he wants but i am so sick of simplistic people …no charles not really. not everyone hates bo because he is black.
      i hated bill clinton with a passion and kept a dart gun by the tv to shoot him in the face with a sucker dart every time he came on, but it wasn’t because he was white. it was because he was a spinless socialist pig who had no personal integrity. i hate barack obama for the same reason except he is exponentially worse. it isn’t rocket science, you know people can detest people for way more than a dumb think like their ethnic background.

      Reply
      1. Charles

        I am interested in this. Make a list of all the reasons you hate Barack Obama and send them to me at tcbkjbbrown@comcast.net.

        Reply
        1. Charles

          Where is your list?

          Reply
        2. biblebeliever

          Warmonger. New instigator of another Cold war maybe Hot war with Russia, globalist peon. Signer of NDAA which wipes away the Constitution on several amendments and the Bill of Rights. Would be signer of TPP which will decimate the USA economy. Has advanced every one of Bush’s agendas, except for the social liberal stuff. Pushed Obamacare which is enriching his cronies in the pharmaceutical and insurance companies and many of the poor cannot actually afford. There’s far more to dislike him for then being a godless liberal.

          Reply
          1. Charles

            I bet you do not really know anything about Obamacare and how it is really working on a day-to-day basis—but you have read your fill of negative propaganda. Our family is on Obamacare. Why not go to the horse’s mouth and ask if you want to know the truth about what it is like to be on Obamacare. I’m the horse.

  21. Kat

    Are you surprised that Alfredo SImon is the first 10 game winner in the league? And how many games do you think he will win this season, before his arm falls off?

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)
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  22. gimpi1

    You’ve got a 1-trip pass for the way-back machine. You can go back and change any one decision, action, attitude in your past. What, aside from your decision to become a pastor, what would you choose to change?

    Reply
  23. it's only me

    If I know for a fact that someone abducted, drugged, raped, tortured and filmed a completely innocent young lady, and it is reported to the police and the police do nothing, is it ok to get justice myself as this person’s sole remaining parent? Since I no longer believe in god, i don’t see what other option i have both to get justice and to prevent him doing this to other people (there is some forensic evidence that he has done this to perhaps a dozen people total, and the police do nothing anyway, even given all this evidence). I actually approached Anonymous the hacker collective about this, but they never did anything. Is it ok for me to get justice and to stop this monster?

    Reply
    1. Charles

      No. However, it appears to me that your question is a classic “set up” to make some point. What is your point?

      Reply
  24. Pingback: Suggestion Saturday: June 21, 2014 | On The Other Hand

  25. Charles

    Why do the Christian fundamentalists and conservative evangelicals on the so-called Religious Right deal in lies, distortion of the truth, and telling half-truths (while ignoring the whole truth) to advance their assorted causes on the American stage. Here is just one example with David Barton, a man with no academic credentials in American history:

    http://tfninsider.org/

    It has always seemed to me that many of these people are pathological liars. In my Sunday school classes many years ago, I never ran into a scripture that says it is okay to lie as long as you are doing it for what you believe is a good cause. This is so confusing.

    Reply
  26. Van

    What similarities do you see in wacko American Christians fundamentalists and wacko middle Eastern Islamic fundamentalists? What differences? Which group do you think is wackier, and why?

    Reply
  27. biblebeliever

    1. If you die and find out Christianity is true, what will be the first thing you think, say or do?

    2. Do you realize there are Christians out there who hate the religious right and know it is run by wicked men who seek power and see through the right/left shell-game?

    3. Did you ever go through a religious questioning or doubting period as a child or teen? Did you become a Christian because your parents told you this was the “right” thing to do?

    4. Did you ever have an ex-atheist, ex-Wiccan, ex-UU/Humanist/Unity etc, ex-liberal born again Christian as a church member, did any of these folks talk about their testimony to you?

    Reply
    1. Charles

      If you die and find out that God hates Christian fundamentalists and conservative evangelicals—and groups you solidly in the Matthew 23 crowd, what will be the first thing you think, say, or do?

      I know what you will say: “But Father. Why did you lie to us?”

      Then God will say: “I didn’t lie to you. Every damned one of you lied to yourselves.”

      Just sayin’.

      Reply
  28. Zoe

    biblebeliever:

    “1. If you die and find out Christianity is true, what will be the first thing you think, say or do?”

    Zoe: Which Christianity? I guess before being sent to eternal hell’s flames I’d ask “God” (assuming it is your God and your Christian God and your brand of Christianity which I think likely includes eternal damnation forever in the fires of hell) . . . Did You God ever change your mind?

    biblebeliever:

    “2. Do you realize there are Christians out there who hate the religious right and know it is run by wicked men who seek power and see through the right/left shell-game?”

    Zoe: Well this would not surprise me at all. To be expected I think. It is not uncommon in my experience to witness Christian on Christian hate.

    biblebeliever:

    “3. Did you ever go through a religious questioning or doubting period as a child or teen? Did you become a Christian because your parents told you this was the “right” thing to do?”

    Zoe:

    First question: I did. I was born into Christianity. My first questioning began at age 13 when at an evangelical church camp I first learned that the Jesus who loved me and the Jesus whom I had loved would burn me forever, casting me away from Himself and heaven if I was not “born-again.” Up and until that time I never questioned or doubted. I had never not believed in Jesus. It was then when I began to doubt.

    Second question: No. My parents were not present at the camp when I was born-again.

    biblebeliever:

    “4. Did you ever have an ex-atheist, ex-Wiccan, ex-UU/Humanist/Unity etc, ex-liberal born again Christian as a church member, did any of these folks talk about their testimony to you?”

    Zoe:

    First question: I don’t know.

    Second question: What’s your point?

    Reply
  29. Charles

    I have another question for Bruce:

    Among other things, I write and edit for a living. Therefore,I have a fascination with language. Also, being an anthropologist, I have a fascination with various aspects of human culture and always want to know what makes those little watches tick.

    It is necessary for me to be honest here. In my opinion, Christian fundamentalist and conservative evangelical “church language” is one of the silliest sounding things I have ever heard. It sounds so silly to me that I have to wonder how many people say, “I would like to come to Jesus, but if I have to hear talk that sounds this silly and they expect me to talk that way too, then I’m outa here!!!”

    Here are just a few examples:

    1) I have heard this phrase repeatedly over the years, usually in the context of “What if the Bible is found not to be inerrant?” or “What if it turns out that evolution really did happen?”

    The phrase in question: “Then all is lost.” Then all is lost. Then all is lost. Then all is lost.

    2) Use of the word “just,” usually pronounced “jist” down south. Hearing this makes me want to tear my hair out.

    Example: “Dear Lord. I jist pray this morning that you would jist, jist, jist, jist listen to our suffering and jist aid us and jist, jist make us jist in thy presence.”

    3) Laid it on my heart.

    Example: I jist wanted to tell all of my brothers and sisters this here mornin’ that I is been a prayin’ hard and the Lord has jist LAID IT ON MY HEART THAT…”

    4) Preaching and the term “UH.”

    Example: “I want to preach UH to you this morning UH that your vile sins UH is a eatin’ you alive UH.”

    5) I had a Christian fundamentalist acquaintance on the NOLA LIVE! web forum who would use this canned phrase every time a famous person died.

    Example: And we are sorry to report that comedian Bob Hope died this morning at the age of 100. HE IS IN HELL NOW. Lucille Ball died this morning from massive aortic bleeding. SHE IS IN HELL NOW. Captain Kangaroo died this morning. HE IS IN HELL NOW. After a long life, mother Teresa died this morning. SHE IS IN HELL NOW. Although it has not happened,,,yet. Billy Graham died this morning. HE IS IN HELL NOW.

    There must be several hundred more of these cliche and canned expressions, and every damned one of them hits my ear like fingernails on a blackboard. Where did this nonsense get started, and why are people perpetuating it from one generation to the next? What can we do as Americans to stop this nonsense and get these people to use normal, everyday language. I bet they scare 10,000 people away from Jesus every Sunday morning just by making them listen to this crap.

    Signed,

    Perturbed

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      You are so right about there being a language, a code that is common in Evangelical/fundamentalist churches. I see a lot if churches use this language on their outside sign…never bothering to consider that the outsider, the uninitiated, doesn’t know what the hell they are talking about.

      Knowing what the words mean is a sure sign that you are in the club. :)

      Reply
      1. Charles

        Thanks. What is the “UH” all about in preaching. Is it a cadence like iambic pentameter with an “UH” as a punctuation to allow the preacher an “inhalation break.”?

        My hypothesis is something else that goes something like this. A bunch of country bumpkins wanted to be preachers, but having quit school in 6th to 8th grade, they missed out on English and public speaking. Therefore, their first ever sermon went something like this: “Well..ugh…I guess we will..ugh…talk about Adam and…ugh…yeah…ugh…Eve. I think that was her name? Well now…ugh…ugh…ugh…open yer…ugh…Bibles to…ugh Genesis 6…ugh…sorry…ugh…..ugh…no. That should have been Genesis 1.”

        Some guy then noticed that 700 preachers were stumbling and bumbling the same way. He gathered assorted church leaders around a bonfire in front of the church outhouse and said, “This is really embarrassing, just like people who use the term ‘you know’ every other word in conversation. We need a way out of this.”

        Then old Fred raised his hand and said, “I got an idea. Let’s start a whole new style of preaching where we intentionally insert an “UH” every few words so our boys in the pulpits can put the three words they can remember together and still keep their “ugh.” Then they won’t sound so uninitiated and silly. The “UH” will look like an intentional thing in the preaching style.

        I thank you UH Bruce UH for your response UH. Mock, yeah. Ing, yeah. Bird, yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

        Reply
  30. Carmen

    Well, Charles, that last comment of yours jist made me laugh and laugh. ..

    Reply
  31. René

    Dear Bruce,

    one of the things we atheists are often accused off is that our life has no meaning, that there is no purpose without a god. As far as I understand, Christians see the final goal of their existence in going to heaven, but for what purpose other then their personal well-being? Is there anything in the bible or is this even discussed among Christians what the point of this is? Sure, if the stories would be true, heaven, nirvana or any other kind of eternal bliss is a nice reward for following a particular religion but to me this still does not answer the question of “why” does a god want you to achieve this goal.

    As I am surrounded by friends and family who are either atheists as well, agnostics or cultural Christians (born in a Christian surrounding and kind of believing in it without thinking or doing much about it; what we call “submarine-Christians”: only surfacing in church for weddings & funerals), no-one I know is qualified to answer this question, but maybe you with your scholary knowledge of the bible can.

    Best wishes,

    René

    Reply
  32. Angie

    Why are conservative christians mean to women, minorities, agnostics, atheists? Also, why are they trying to impose a dominionist theocracy, and force everyone to believe exactly as they do? Why is their worldview, and literal Bible sayings the only correct one? Do they even read the entire Bible, or only the passages that suit their needs?

    Reply
    1. Joyce

      Also, why are they trying to impose a dominionist theocracy, and force everyone to believe exactly as they do?

      I have a question related to this. I’m not sure I care WHY, but I want to know HOW. They seem to be fighting awfully hard for something that isn’t remotely realistic, as far as I can see. How do they think they are going to run a theocracy if the greatest majority don’t want it? (Because I don’t think even most right leaning conservative Christians do want it.) A theocracy would involve scrapping a lot of what US citizens hold near and dear –and which most of them don’t realize they’d lose–but once they realize, watch out! I’m just wondering how then envision this new world they want to create . . . do they think everyone who isn’t them will embrace what they are selling? I just don’t know what they are thinking. Do they really think that the US is going to be a country of 3.5 million church goers, headed by a father while the mom stays at home to home school, raise countless children, and bake apple pies all day? Have they stopped and thought anything through? I’m so curious about this.

      Reply
  33. Charles

    Angie and Joyce. The short answer is that they probably have no plan to govern at this point. The WHY is that they believe it is what God wants, and they will be rewarded for it. As for the HOW, just read about Rousas Rushdoony and watch the following interview question answered on video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6f0ZHaoSnf0

    Reply
  34. George

    Do you have fat depots in your brain too?What are you storing all this fat for?

    Evolution is impossible.If you study anatomy,physiology, biochemistry etc you will come to know the human body is a highly complex machine clearly designed by an intelligence, with every cell /tissue/organ doing its part to sustain the organism.Something beautiful coming from absolute “nothing necessitates an intelligent Creator outside time and space.”Evolution is an atheist’s propoganda that disguises as science.
    But since you are an ignorant gluttunous fuck with no reasoning capacities, I feel i have wasted 30 s of my life!
    I don’t give a shit whether you post this or not.

    Reply
    1. Joyce

      Well isn’t that just charming. It’s interesting that the people who leave the nasty comments don’t know correct grammar, don’t know how to type, don’t know how to use punctuation, and don’t know how to spell. They also never proofread their posts before clicking Send. All that on top of being rude.

      Reply
      1. Charles

        Worst of all, he does not know or understand anything about evolution. As a Christian, I encounter these people all the time. If you ask them if they have ever taken a college course in evolutionary biology, human paleontology, historical geology, or whatever else, the answer is always the same, “No, I didn’t have to because I just knew it was wrong.” That’s like saying, “No. I have never seen a match, but I just know that a person cannot use one to start a fire.”

        Ignorance is as ignorance does.

        Reply
  35. Tony

    Bruce I was wondering what does the bible REALLY say about slavery, does Leviticus 25:44-46 justifiy what you would call chattel slavery? I had a discussion with a christian recently and he denied it, saying that the people mentioned in Leviticus 25:44-46 are willing indentured servents who will be let go once their debt is paid! Is he wrong about Levitcus 25:44-46?

    here are some quotes from him “Hebrews were permitted to purchase people who had sold themselves into indentured service to another individual. Sometimes that individual would sell them off in order to recover their debt more quickly. Hebrews were permitted to purchase such indentured servants, who would work off their purchase price as servants to the Hebrew who bought them.”

    “The laws for servants who were non-Hebrews were slightly different. For them there was no automatic release, either in the Jubilee year (Leviticus 25:44-46), or the seventh year of debt cancellation (Deuteronomy 15:3). These foreign indentured servants were outside the covenant community, and did not receive the benefit of debt cancellation. The Hebrews were permitted to pass them on as an inheritance to the next generation until their debts were repaid, which is the meaing of ‘olam’ in Leviticus 25:46 (translated ‘perpetually’). The text does not mean they were permanent possessions, but is an explanation as to why they do not go out at the seventh year of release or the Jubilee as the Hebrews do (the reason being that their debts are not cancelled).”
    http://bibleapologetics.wordpress.com/slavery-in-the-bible-25/

    is he proof-texting?

    Reply

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