I’m Not Preaching Now, I’m Telling the Truth

preaching

I attended Midwestern Baptist College in Pontiac, Michigan from 1976-1979. Midwestern, started in 1954 by Alabama preacher Tom Malone, was a small fundamentalist Baptist college.  Malone pastored nearby Emmanuel Baptist Church. In the 1970’s, Emmanuel was one of the largest churches in the country. Today its buildings are shuttered and a FOR SALE sign sits in the dust-covered main entrance door.

During my time at Midwestern, I heard Tom Malone preach several hundred times. Considered by many to be a great pulpiteer, Malone’s preaching was fervent and punctuated with illustrations meant to drive home the point he was making. During one sermon, Malone said something I never forgot. In the middle of sharing an illustration, Malone said:

I’m not preaching now, I’m telling the truth.

Everyone laughed and then he finished his illustration.

Over the march of my life from infancy to the grave, I’ve heard thousands of sermons and preached thousands more. I’ve heard men that had no public speaking skills and others who were wordsmiths capable of enchanting hearers with their preaching and illustrations. Sadly, there are a lot more of the former than the latter.  Even though I am an atheist, I still enjoy hearing a well crafted sermon delivered by a man who knows how to turn a word into an epic Broadway production.

Preaching only the Bible is boring, uninspiring preaching. An effective sermon requires illustrations. Jesus was a master storyteller. His sermons made ample use of illustrations meant to drive home a spiritual point. A preacher that is good at his craft knows that illustrations are key to helping listeners understand and embrace his sermon. And therein lies the danger.

When I started preaching, I used illustrations from illustration books. As I aged and experienced more of life, I began to use more and more illustrations about my experiences and personal life. If a preacher isn’t careful, it is easy to massage his illustrations to “fit” a particular sermon or audience. Sometimes, the illustration becomes a lie.

As I mentioned above, I’ve heard a lot of sermons. I’ve heard thousands of illustrations and personal stories, all meant to get my attention or drive home a point. Over time, I came to understand that many preachers played loose with the truth, often shaping their stories to make a particular point or to cast themselves in a positive light. In other words, they lied, even if they don’t understand they are doing so. Often, a speaker can tell the same lie over and over until they reach a point where the lie become reality and they think it is the truth.

Take Jack Hyles, by all accounts a masterful speaker and storyteller. He was also a narcissistic liar. I heard Hyles preach numerous times at Sword of the Lord and Bible conferences. His sermons were usually long on illustrations and short on Scripture and exegesis. For Hyles, it was all about the sermon, the story, and the invitation. Everything he said was meant to bring hearers to a point of making a decision for or against Jesus.

Here’s a story Hyles told about winning an auto mechanic to Christ:

When I got to his house, he was working under the car. He was lying face up on a creeper and could not see me as I arrived.

“Hyles Mechanic Service!” I shouted.

“Who called you?” he asked.

“I was not called,” I replied, “I was sent.”

“Well, roll yourself under and see if you can see what is the trouble.”

I got another creeper, laid down on it, and roiled myself under the car with him.

“Looks like to me you need the valves ground,” I shouted.

“How can you tell from under here?”

“I am not talking about your car. I am talking about you.”

“Who are you?” he asked.

“I am Pastor Hyles of First Baptist Church.”

Then he became inquisitive, and I explained to him that he needed Christ as Saviour to make him a new creature and that he was in worse shape than the car. With both of us lying on our backs looking up at the bottom side of the car, I told him how to be saved. When time came to pray the sinner’s prayer, he closed by saying, “Lord, I am just coming for a general overhauling.” I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry, so I did both. The next Sunday he came forward in our service professing his faith in Christ.

Great story, and one I have no doubt is an admixture of truth and lie. Every time I read a story like this I am reminded of that Sunday morning almost forty years ago when I heard Tom Malone say, “I’m not preaching now, I’m telling the truth.”  Now, that will preach, as the Baptists like to say.

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7 Comments

  1. Steve

    ‘Ol Jack was the man, that’s for sure! Occasionally, I’ll go to YouTube, find one of his sermons & listen, like old times; he was one of the greatest orators ever, that’s for sure

    Reply
  2. Brian

    Now, all you pew-stuck Sunday dressers just stay where you are because I’m about to stop telling the truth and start preachin’! Yahoo! Let ‘er rip! (I enjoyed your interview this morning on Minnesota radio, Bruce. Came in loud and clear in B.C.! I also got a kick out of the commercials they run and their efforts to appeal to non-believers, the all-knowing insurance agent and the cafe where you can get discounts by bringing in your daily bulletin from church! Lots of laughs. Gracias.

    Reply
  3. Monty

    I loath it when Christians want to come to me “in truth”. Had that happen recently despite the fact that, when I worked for him in ministry, I went to a coworker in regards to how they were talking to me on the phone (I was treated like dirt). They brought the issue to him, in which he repeatedly told me it was just my “perspective”. But now he doesn’t like what I’ve written (about other people- it was how I was treated by other Christians) but wants to come to me in “truth”??? You know what I eventually told him, right? That it was just his perspective lol!!

    Reply
  4. Jada

    Oh, so when he’s preaching he’s *not* telling the truth, then?

    Reply
  5. Bro. Elliot John Kane

    I’m sorry but as an old-fashioned exegetical, fundamentalist baptist who fights quick-prayerism and the man-centered religion you once held sir, I find this abhorrent, to think you attended a fundamentalist college and even pastored several churches all the while being a viperous snake and an infidel who abhorred the Word of the Lord… Unbelievable, even by the low standards of many Hyleseristic churches which don’t preach repentance, unbelievable – A humanist!

    The Lord forgive you sir.

    Reply
    1. Bruce Gerencser (Post author)

      Why Brother Elliot,

      I believed just like you for many years. Shall we both whip out our theology dicks and see whose is bigger?

      I loved Jesus, the Word of God, preached expositionally, and believed repentance was an essential element of salvation.

      So, do you want to have a conversation, or were you just spreading a load of Australian kangaroo shit for the hell of it?

      You got one opportunity here, Elliot. I suggest you use it wisely.

      Reply
    2. Zoe

      May your lord forgive you Elliot. You’re going to need it.

      Reply

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