Bart Ehrman Interview About His Latest Book: The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the World

bart ehrman

Recently, Bart Ehrman appeared on NPR’s Fresh Air program to talk about his latest book,  The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the World.

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Books by Bart Ehrman

The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the World

Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why

How Jesus Became God : the Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee

Jesus Before the Gospels: How the Earliest Christians Remembered, Changed, and Invented Their Stories of the Savior

Jesus, Interrupted: Revealing the Hidden Contradictions in the Bible (And Why We Don’t Know About Them)

Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth

Forged: Writing in the Name of God–Why the Bible’s Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are

God’s Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question — Why We Suffer

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1 Comment

  1. Troy

    Like Bart Ehrman, I also accept there was probably a historical Jesus. I also have been accused of being religious for this by other atheists. The problem with what I would call the Richard Carrier hypothesis equating Jesus of Nazareth with other presumed fictional figures like Herakles, is that I presume Herakles to have existed as well. In the Herakles narrative each iteration of the story makes him a bit stronger until at some point he is strength personified. In the Jesus narrative he gets more godlike until he is God personified.
    Possibly the best evidence for the historical Jesus is the amount of convolution required to get Jesus to be in the house of David for example. The obvious rivalry between John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth (likely competing cults) is also very telling. There is always a possibility of Jesus being a parable that tells parables (actually it would make for a delicious irony) but convergence of evidence points to a historical dude.

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